Roses

Why grow roses?: Cut flowers, colour and fragrance

Arrangment header2As cut flowers:

The image of a huge bowl of roses inspires many people to plant roses in their garden. Hybrid Tea roses, which usually produce a profusion of flowering stems, with one bud per stem, are by far the most popular. Other varieties that also provide an array of good cut flowers are Floribundas, Fairy Tale roses, Antico Moderno’s, David Austin’s English roses, Miniatures, Climbers and Colourscape roses. See our suggested cut roses here.

 

colour2To provide colour:

Modern roses are able to flower virtually continuously for 10 months of the year, colouring our gardens and our lives with an abundance and variety that is virtually unparalleled in the flower kingdom. The great variation in growth patterns allows for selecting varieties that give colour at different heights, and particularly at eye level. Read in more detail.  See our different types of roses for more info.

smell2For their scent:

The fragrance of roses is legendary. Roses in antiquity were grown as much for their scent as for  their beauty – today, with the proliferation of rose varieties, the choice is that much wider. It is a fact that rose fragrance acts calmingly as an anti depressant. Read more detail.  Find our most fragrant roses here. 

camera-memories-pink-pink-rose2 copyRomantic Connotations:

Roses have names and these have often romantic connotations. The name might be the same as that of a family member or because it is a rose that was treasured by someone dear, it may bring back memories or it lets you envisage the music or wonder for which it was named. Roses with names that have such meaning and connotations as for instance My Granny, Vienna Woods, Maria Callas, Vivaldi, My Estelle, Evelyn or True Love are favourites.