Rose Care: Fertilising

Regular fertilising roses during the growing season is essential, and plants react promptly to additional nutrition. However, fertilizer is not the solution to all ills – and two handfuls of fertiliser are not invariably better than one. Roses are often burned by having too much fertilizer placed in a heap next to the main stem or sprinkled in a narrow circle around it. Fertilizer is only of use when it is dissolved by water and carried to the roots, which are more or less confined to the space in the rose bed or hole in which they were planted.

Good news! Ludwig’s Vigolonger cannot burn the roots. A multi-coated general fertiliser with a controlled release of balanced nutrients over 8 month.

It is easy to apply and you don;t have to worry about remembering to apply it monthly. Let me show you how:

 

Fertilising method

Sprinkle the 30g measure cup of Ludwig’s Vigorosa fertiliser or a handful of other Rose Fertiliser brands over each bush once a month or even every six weeks from August until about April. Very keen rosarians might prefer to fertilize lightly every week or every fortnight, in which case the handful is applied to three plants instead of one. In cold regions, apply fertilizer only until the end of February or early March.

Sprinkle the fertiler around the plant and water well there after.

Sprinkle the fertiler around the plant and water well there after.

Fertiliser burn

If you have over-fertilised your roses you should try to dilute the fertiliser to the subsoil. Water deeply 2 to 3 days in a row.

Leaves and stems have been burnt severely by over fertilising

Leaves and stems have been burnt severely by over fertilising

Fertiliser burn has stopped. The eye of the upper leaf axle is sprouting again.

Fertiliser burn has stopped. The eye of the upper leaf axle is sprouting again.

Plants to the left have been fertilised. Plants to the right have been missed and are a much lighter, more yellow shade of green.

Plants to the left have been fertilised. Plants to the right have been missed and are a much lighter, more yellow shade of green.

VIGOROSA

Vigorosa consists of a desired balance of Nitrogen, Phosphorus, Potassium, Calcium, Epsom salt (Magnesium Sulphate) and humic acids.

In order to appreciate VIGOROSA as a superior fertiliser, one needs to understand the action of HUMIC ACID.

The roots of plants need to absorb nutrients in the soil in order for them to grow and produce food. Any organic matter, be it leaf litter, bark chips, pine needles, straw, hay, lucerne, saw dust, vegetables, needs to decay to compost – either in the soil, as mulch or in a heap. Before compost has any nutritious value it has to finally become Humus or more accurately, humic acids. Humic acids consist of complex macromolecules and represent a mixture of four main distinct components: Humic acid, fulvic acid, ulmic acid and humin.

The benefits of humic acids include physical property changes, chemical changes and biological changes in the soil. Humic acids enhance fertilization. Humic acids provide a way of storing the various nutrients provided by chemical fertilizers (the so called ions of calcium, potassium, magnesium, nitrate nitrogen etc.) for absorption by the root system, rather than allowing them to travel to the water table below and be lost to the plant.

The practical application:

On newly planted roses VIGOROSA should only be applied about a month after planting at half the 30 g measuring cup.

Growing rose bushes should receive 30g of VIGOROSA monthly from August until April.

Vigorosa is best sprinkled over the leaved bushes to achieve an even spread over the rooting zone. Fertiliser dust on the leaves to be brushed or watered off.

Vigorosa needs not be dug into the soil. Water will dissolve it and carry it through the mulch to the roots.