Newsletters: talking roses in December ’16

Successful gardening is not necessarily a question of wealth, it is a question of love, taste, and knowledge.
Vita Sackville-West

In the Rose Garden with Ludwig

The roses just kept on blooming and November turned out to be an excellent extension to the traditional Rose month.

Granted, some varieties flower more powerfully than others so one had a good chance to observe the real performers. Obviously, the weather had something to do with this; not too hot with cloudy days and even some rain in-between. Most important and welcome is the re-flowering of some climbers and all the Panarosas.

each bloom of 'The Yellow' draws the eye but look at the mass of blooms of 'Forever Busy' behind

Each bloom of ‘The Yellow’ draws the eye, but just look at the mass of blooms of ‘Forever Busy’ in the back ground.

Garden & Home remains a super performer!

‘Garden & Home’ remains a super performer!

Creme Caramel in Nov

‘Créme Caramel’  in flush again during November. Not only the colour, but the scent!

Comtesse Panarosa Nov

‘Comtesse Panarosa’ also a climber that repeats easily.

Carmine GrandiRosa

‘Carmine GrandiRosa’ – form and colour are out of this world!

Cherry Garland  second flush

‘Cherry Garland’ – the second flush is almost as vibrant as the first one.

Ann Wrighton group

‘Ann Wrighton’ – shining and exuding sweet fragrance!

Anne Lorentz produces cut roses non stop

‘Anne Lorentz’ produces perfect cut roses non stop.

I receive daily queries through all the various communication methods and on social media. We are always happy and eager to oblige by trying to solve the problem or identify the variety.

It makes it much easier when the region or city the rose is growing in, is mentioned.

Bloom colour intensity can differ from area to area and pest and diseases are also more prevalent in certain regions at different times of the year.

Blooms are much clearer to identify when the stems, leaves and prickles are shown in the picture.

The one statement that always makes me smile is: ”But, they all get the same treatment, so why is this rose not doing as well as the others?”

My standard reply is: “We always try to treat all our children the same way and why do they not all respond in the same way?”

For sure – every rose variety has its own personality and one needs to be a rose whisperer to understand this.It can often be something small, that needs to be rectified and the rose recovers in no time.

By creating groups i.e. Fairy Tale Roses, Spire Roses, GrandiRosa, Panarosa, etc… we ensure that growth pattern, disease resistance and flower shape are fairly uniform, which then gives them a chance to perform more easily with the same treatment.

all treated the same way

These roses stand in the same bed, receive the same all round treatment, but some are doing well and performing while others don’t look too good.

In early September, we replanted 20-year-old climbers with a row of ‘Iceberg’ in front of the new climbing roses. The Climbers are starting to throw up water shoots and should provide a show in autumn and be spectacular by next October. However, not surprisingly, the ‘Icebergs’ are already making an impact.

Iceberg planted on rose mile

‘Iceberg’ planted in front of climbers on our rose mile.

Indeed some of our mother plants and fragrant cut roses are aging and our soil is getting “tired of roses” which is a direct translation of “die Erde ist Rosenmüde”. Since we do not have the option of planting alternative crops for three years, nor do we have enough card board boxes (to follow our general advice for private gardeners), we have done it the hard way by exchanging the soil.

trench for re-planting

We remove the soil by digging a trench for re-planting. My grandsons’ favourite vehicle does the job!

enriching soil for new beds with peanut shell

We enrich the new soil with peanut shells.

the finished bed ready for new plants

The finished rose bed, ready for its new plants.

Here, the soil was not prepared sufficiently deep the roots grew horizontal close to the surface and suffered duriung the summers heat and drought.  This will not happen with new plantings

Here, the soil was not prepared to a deep enough level.

When the bed or hole the roses are to be planted in is not prepared to a deep enough level, the roots grow horizontally, close to the surface. They then suffer during the summer’s heat and drought.  This will not happen if the preparation is done properly.

I have a lot of fun walking almost daily through our trials. It is the time of year to decide on any novelties to be released in September 2017. It is not so much about the colour, but finding the right growth habit, foliage and firmness of the petals to withstand heat and rain. The beetles help me find the most fragrant roses.

Overall view of some of our trial roses - each plant is different!

Overall view of some of our trial roses – each plant is different!

the rose for the future by shading its own roots they will stretch deeper and wider. Expect over 50 pickable blooms at a time from this bush

A rose for the future – by shading its own roots, they will stretch deeper and wider. Expect over 50 pick able blooms at a time from this bush.

a yellow that does not bl;each and holds the petals frim in the heat

A yellow that does not bleach and holds the petals firm in the heat.

a super healthy broad compact shrublike  roise nwith huge full Antico Moderni type blooms

A super-healthy, broad, compact shrublike rose, with huge, full Antico Moderno type blooms.

blooms from bottom to top. note the yet unopened buds to unfold  as also the glossy healthy leaves

Produces blooms from top to bottom. Note the yet unopened buds that are still to unfold, as well as the glossy, healthy leaves.

the big hope a almost black rose - but it burns in hot summer days

Our big hope – shattered! An almost black rose – but its blooms burn brittle on a hot summer’s day.

neat compact spread out and the blooms one to a stem are still unblemished after heat and rain

A neat ,compact, spread out bush. The blooms are borne one to a stem and are still unblemished after heat and rain.

his is high on my list for release

This novelty is high on my priority list for release next year.

flowering from bottom upwards with super foliage is a strong point for a thumbs up

Flowering from the bottom upwards, with super foliage, is a strong point for a definite thumbs up!

beetle damage indicates the fragrant blooms

Beetle damage indicates the fragrant blooms.

The Rosy bag as advertised in our catalogue:  Estimated arrival at our premises from China is now the 15th December. It will be a very nice Christmas present. With your laptop or I-pad in it, it cannot easily be mistaken.

Happenings

About 300 keen runners and walkers took part in ‘The Rose Run’ last weekend. The little rain we had the night before kept the air nice and fresh and clear and it seems that young and old enjoyed the excercise

rose run

Run of the Roses.

Walk and Talk

Where: Ludwig’s Rose Farm – Kloppersbos / Pyramid rd, N1 Pretoria

When: Fri 16 Dec 2016, at 9h30 – Heritage day

Join Ludwig for an informative walk and talk around the rose farm. He will point out the little secrets that make rose growing so much fun! You are welcome to bring any samples of roses that are not doing as well as they should. Best to wear walking shoes and a hat.

For those who can’t walk all the way, the cushioned tractor trailer will follow the crowd.

Free of charge. Booking not necessary.

ii

Where: Ludwig’s Roses Outeniqua – Rosenhof, Waboomskraal near George

When: Fri 16 Dec 2016, at 10h00 – Heritage day

Enjoy a relaxed and informative walk through the roses with Halmar. Booking is not necessary and attendance is free of charge!

Tour to Provence, Italy – May 12th to 21st 2017

My wife, Pamela, is organising a cooking, gardens and markets tour to Provence in May 2017. To see what this wonderful tour entails, please follow this link… 

To contact Pamela for more info click here…

Step by Step Rose Care for December

Countrywide, it seems that the weather pattern is still erratic and this month’s advice needs to be seen within the context of the local weather condition.

Without frequent drenching rains and with water restrictions in place, the advice of the past months still applies:

these chlortic blotches are the indication that the spider mites are busy on the underside of the leaves

These chlorotic blotches are an indication that the spider mites are busy sucking on the underside of the leaves.

If good rainfalls are experienced the roses will immediately start making new hair roots and start sprouting.

With no follow up rain, an effort should be made to water more frequently.

With a good water supply available whether by rain, municipal or bore hole, the normal summer rose care applies:

Water well every second day or daily with a little less. If it gets hot and you feel you want to get under a shower, know that your roses would also love to receive an extra watering, preferably over the leaves.

With enough water and high temperatures, the roses want to grow and for this they need nutrients. The regular monthly fertilising is most important.

Even if VIGOLONGER was mixed with the soil in early spring, this is the time of year that they would like a boost, so an extra dose of VIGOROSA will encourage new growth and flowering.

VIGOROSA just needs to be sprinkled around the bushes. The water will dissolve it and gradually carry the nutrients to the roots.

strong resprouting after blooms were cut still retaining good foliage

When the roses are fed with Vigorosa, strong re-sprouting after the blooms were cut happens and the rose still retains good foliage.

Where there is high humidity and wet leaves because of rainy and overcast weather, fungus spores will be activated and germinate and enter the leaves.

Therefore, preventative spraying is most important. Our cocktail of Ludwig’s Insect Spray, Chronos and the adjuvant Picanta is still the most effective combination without being very poisonous.

For up to 10 roses in pots the Rose Protector ready-to-use hand spray works well.

Although Ludwig’s Insect Spray and Rose Protector should keep beetles away, it is a case of which smell is stronger – the rose’s or the insecticide.

The fragrance of certain rose varieties is just irresistible to them.

If they are simply not leaving your roses alone, you can spray Plant Care or Cyper at a double dose.

The best time to spray is when they are at their busiest.

Make sure to spray the lower leaves thoroughly, so that you can keep the nocturnal chafer beetles, that lace the leaves, away.

The only other way is to physically walk to each affected rose hold a small bucket half filled with water and some oil floating on it under the bloom the beetles are chewing at and give it a shake. They fall downwards and land in the bucket.

this is how it is dine

This is how it is done. You can get young children to catch them for an incentive for each one caught.

rich harvest within 15 minutes

A rich harvest within 15 minutes.

Without them falling into and being trapped in the bucket, halfway down to the ground they fly away.

Many decades ago a gardener told me that he had caught beetles, put them into a blender and that he sprayed the beetle juice onto his roses. He found that the beetles must be carnivorous, as there were more beetles attacking his roses than ever before!

We put up home-made traps made out of two-litre coke bottles and placed ripe banana pieces and even nicely smelly rose buds into them, but no, the beetles preferred ravishing the fragrant rose blooms around the trap.

If you are staying at home and plan to enjoy your own garden and home over the Christmas period then you will want the roses too look neat, which means keep on cutting off dead blooms and grooming. Again, it is a case of ensuring a good balance of leaves to remain, meaning – never cut too many blooms with long stems at once.

 having all development stages on a bush is ideal for the bush and to look at

Having all the development stages on one bush is ideal for the bush and it look great too.

Roses of the Month: ‘Eyes for You’ PEJbigeye(N)

Eyes for You

This month we have selected a special and very different rose. ‘Eyes for You’ resulted from crosses made out of Rosa Persica, which is a species rose that is the only rose bloom that has the dark centre or eye.

These days many hybrids have been released that have been developed from the Rosa Persica. We have however extensively trialed them and this one is the very best in our climate.

A compact growing, neat floribunda covers itself with semi-double cream white blooms with a distinct deep brown pink eye at the centre of each bloom. The quick repeat flowering bush is vigorous and healthy, ideal for large beds, borders and growing in pots.

News from our Rose Centres

Ludwig’s Rose Farm

Walk and Talk

When: Fri 16 Dec 2016, at 9h30 – Heritage day

Join Ludwig for an informative walk and talk around the rose farm. He will point out the little secrets that make rose growing so much fun! You are welcome to bring any samples of roses that are not doing as well as they should. Best to wear walking shoes and a hat.

For those who can’t walk all the way, the cushioned tractor trailer will follow the crowd.

Free of charge. Booking not necessary.

Ludwig’s Roses Outeniqua

Walk and Talk

When: Fri 16 Dec 2016, at 10h00 – Heritage day

Enjoy a relaxed and informative walk through the roses with Halmar. Booking is not necessary and attendance is free of charge!

All our rose centres are open over December and for most public holidays. We look forward to welcoming you!

Thank you for your support during 2016!

Wishing you a wonderful festive season and may the New Year be filled with happiness, joy and lots and lots of roses!

Rose greetings,
Ludwig